The Future of Humanitarian Action

The Power of Communities

Record forced displacement; growing inequality; catastrophic natural disasters exacerbated by climate change; the fallout from a once-in-a generation global pandemic; and protracted armed conflicts raging on multiple fronts — within this context, we'll ask whether the humanitarian system that exists today is fit for purpose? This series brings together thought leaders from around the world to discuss these pressing humanitarian issues, and to look at the ways we must build our future together, as well as the unique paradigm shift required to make the shifting and sharing of power to communities a reality.

Register ↓

Conversation Event Series

The Hilton Foundation and Devex will once again host a virtual online conversation series under the theme The Future of Humanitarian Action: The Power of Communities.

Conversation 1: The power of girls' education and women’s leadership to transform communities, countries and economies.

October 28, 2021 - 10 am ET/ 4pm CET

Over 11 million girls may not go back to school after the COVID-19 crisis, according to UNESCO. These young women and girls do not only face structural barriers to their education rooted in poverty, but also in gender inequality and child, early and forced marriage.

However, women-led peer networks can play an important role in protecting vulnerable girls and ensuring their rights are respected. There is tremendous power to be harnessed in local women leaders who can change the status quo from within. So how do we support them?

This event, hosted by Devex in partnership with the Hilton Foundation, will explore how the power of communities can help keep girls in school and ensure that future generations can, in turn, become future leaders – inspiring young girls to pursue the education needed to improve their economic, social, and political power. Together with global and local leaders with lived experiences around these issues, we’ll also draw attention to what must be done to scale their impact and support these organizations to reach even more girls.

Conversations will draw on the far-reaching ripple effects of education – from decreasing child, early and forced marriages to encouraging women entrepreneurs – and highlight why we need to invest more in women-led communities to support the local and sustainable change needed to break cycles of poverty for women everywhere.

Speakers

Dr. Shungu Gwarinda, Director of Programmes of the Graça Machel Trust

Fadzi Whande, Senior Diversity & Inclusion Adviser, Executive Direction and Management, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights

Angeline Murimirwa, Executive Director - Africa, CAMFED

Moderator: Kate Warren, Executive Vice President, Devex

Watch

Conversation 2: Good governance for girls’ education: Creating an enabling environment.

November 17, 2021 - 10 am ET/ 4pm CET

When institutions crumble, so does often girls’ access to education. Girls’ education is a two-way street; missing out on school does long-term damage, not only to each girl, but also to the prospects of their communities and countries. We know girls are more at risk of having their education disrupted by poverty, conflict, epidemics or a pandemic like COVID-19, and millions – particularly adolescent girls – may never return to school as a result.

Yet, girls who do receive a quality education are more likely to delay marriage and childbirth and to have greater income and productivity – the basis for breaking the vicious cycles of poverty needed to foster peace and stability. While policies protecting and promoting equality in education might exist, more effective implementation is needed to not only guarantee access, but also ensure quality education – including secondary education, which oftentimes isn’t accessible to the most vulnerable.

So how can keeping more girls in school help support good governance? This event, hosted by Devex in partnership with the Hilton Foundation, will shine a light on the many interconnected ways that girls’ education and women’s leadership can help support the creation of more peaceful, equitable, and prosperous communities.

Discussions will explore how girls’ education can help support good governance and the enabling environment needed to ensure no girl misses out on school even in conflict affected areas, and the ways it can support stable and peaceful societies.

Speakers

Jo Bourne, Chief Technical Officer, Global Partnership for Education

Diana Ayala, Lead, CEAAL Youth Group in Honduras, and GPE Youth Leader

Sarah Brown, Chair, Theirworld

Barbara Chilangwa, Executive Advisor – Government Relations, CAMFED

Lydia Wilbard, National Director, CAMFED Tanzania

Moderator: Rumbi Chakamba, Associate Editor, Devex

Watch

Conversation 3: Girls’ education and women’s leadership as drivers of climate resilience.

November 30, 2021 - 10 am ET/ 4pm CET

Climate change often affects the most vulnerable first – they are the ones most likely to feel the long-term devastating impacts of natural hazards or extreme weather events such as floods, droughts, or hurricanes.

Gender discrimination means that girls and young women living in poverty are often the ones paying the highest price for destroyed crops, flooded property, and other kinds of disruptions to their families’ livelihoods brought about by the impacts of climate change. When a disaster strikes, these girls and women are often at risk of having their education disrupted, and also face an increased risk of child, early and forced marriage, according to Brookings Institution.

Yet, women are often on the frontlines of community efforts to tackle the effects of climate change, and are integral to building climate resilience and adaptation efforts. Therefore, ensuring that girls stay in school can in and of itself prove a powerful tool to tackle climate change, while addressing the underlying inequalities making them increasingly vulnerable to its devastating effects. For example, estimates suggest that together with access to family planning, girls’ education has the potential of avoiding nearly 85 gigatons of carbon emissions by 2050.

This event, hosted by Devex in partnership with the Hilton Foundation, will explore how investing in girl’s education can help increase their resilience to climate change, but also how it can play a key role in fostering girls’ climate leadership and climate action.

Speakers

Fiona Mavhinga, Executive Advisor, CAMFED Association

Komal Narayan, Climate Activist and Volunteer, Alliance for Future Generations

Christina Kwauk, Nonresident Fellow - Global Economy and Development, Center for Universal Education, Brookings

Beth Roberts, Director, Center for Women’s Land Rights, Landesa

Watch
In this context, how can the power of communities propel girls and young women through education and galvanize community action to tackle inequality?
We will bring together global thought leaders – including this year’s Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize recipient CAMFED – to discuss these pressing issues, and to look at the ways we must build a more equal future for women and girls everywhere.

Save your spot in this series

Speakers


Angeline Murimirwa

Angeline Murimirwa

Executive Director – Africa, CAMFED

Angeline Murimirwa, one of the first young women supported by CAMFED to go to school in Zimbabwe. She is a founding member of the CAMFED Association — the pan-African network of 178,000 women leaders educated with CAMFED support, working to secure every girl's right to quality education. As CAMFED-Africa’s executive director, Murimirwa brings the expertise of young women once excluded from education to inform policy and strategy at every level. Murimirwa has been recognized as one of the 100 most influential women by the BBC. She was awarded the 2020 Yidan Prize for Education Development together with her co-executive Lucy Lake. She is a member of the Council of Luminaries, bringing together the brightest minds to build a better world through education.

Fadzi Whande

Fadzi Whande

Senior Diversity and Inclusion Adviser, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights

Fadzi Whande is an award winning global diversity and inclusion strategist and social justice advocate. Her background ranges from launching telecommunication networks to addressing social disadvantage across governmental, non-profit, educational institutions and corporate sectors in Africa, North America, Australia and the United Kingdom. During this time, Fadzi has led successful large-scale initiatives on gender, sexual orientation and gender identity and the elimination of racial discrimination within the workplace. Over the course of her career she has been the recipient of various awards and accolades for encouraging and inspiring social and cultural inclusion. She is a TEDx speaker, Western Australian of the Year finalist, recipient of the International Racial Equity Leadership Award (USA), and recipient of the Social Impact Award from the Organisation of African Australians. She holds an Executive MBA and Graduate Certificate in Social Impact from the University of Western Australia.

Dr. Shungu Gwarinda

Dr. Shungu Gwarinda

Director of Programmes, Graça Machel Trust

Shungu Gwarinda, PhD, is a seasoned public administrator and organisational leader with 20 years professional experience. She currently serves as the Director of Programmes of the Graca Machel Trust, a Pan-African institution, where she provides strategic leadership for its Children’s Rights and Women’s Economic and Social Advancement Programmes. She started her professional career as a high school teacher in her home country, Zimbabwe, and has remained keen to contribute to efforts that promote access to quality education and opportunities that advance children. Before joining the Trust, Shungu spent 9 years leading maternal health education programmes in countries across East and Southern Africa. Prior to that, she served at the University of Fort Hare in South Africa, coordinating public service capacity building projects in South Africa and South Sudan. Shungu holds a PhD in Public Administration from the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University in South Africa. She has a passion for social policy and the convergence between the role of state and non-state actors in driving development in Africa.

Sarah Brown

Sarah Brown

Chair, Theirworld

Sarah Brown’s work brings together the worlds of business, philanthropy, non-profit activism, and youth campaigning. She is the chair of Theirworld, the global children’s charity dedicated to ending the global education crisis and unlocking big change for the new generation. She is also the Executive Chair of the Global Business Coalition for Education as well as CEO of the Office of Gordon and Sarah Brown established as they left 10 Downing Street in 2010 which looks after their continuing role in public life. Her former role as the Global Patron of the White Ribbon Alliance led to a campaign that resulted in the halving of maternal deaths worldwide culminating in 2010, and Sarah continues to provide strategic leadership to worldwide efforts to save and change the lives of women and children. As a child, her first school was in Arusha, Tanzania in East Africa where her family moved for her early childhood. When they returned to the United Kingdom, Sarah completed her schooling in North London. She holds an Honours degree in Psychology from the University of Bristol and was awarded fellowship of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, and of the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health. She is the author of best-selling book Behind the Black Door and regularly rallies her million plus twitter followers (as @SarahBrownUK) in support of its central message: whatever platform you have in life, you can always use it to make a difference.

Jo Bourne

Jo Bourne

Chief Technical Officer, Global Partnership for Education

Jo Bourne is the Chief Technical Officer of the Global Partnership for Education (GPE). Since 2019, she has led GPE’s Country Engagement and Policy team, a diverse team of education specialists working to support lower-income countries to transform their education systems so that no child is left behind. Before joining GPE, Jo held senior positions shaping education policy and programs in the United Kingdom Department for International Development (DFID) and in UNICEF as the Global Director of Education. She holds an MA in Education and International Development.

Lydia Wilbard

Lydia Wilbard

National Director, CAMFED Tanzania

Lydia Wilbard’s life experience resonates strongly with that of the young women reached by CAMFED programs. Completing her secondary education against great personal odds, she ran several successful businesses to fund her high school and university education. As a founding member of the CAMFED Association in Tanzania, established in 2005, Wilbard became an active business mentor and leader within the leadership network. Awarded a competitive scholarship by the government of the United States, she earned a Master’s in Public Health at Johns Hopkins University and returned to Tanzania to rejoin CAMFED. Her role was expanded to co-director at CAMFED Tanzania in 2012, and national director in 2017.

Barbara Chilangwa

Barbara Chilangwa

Executive Advisor – Government Relations , CAMFED

Barbara Chilangwa is a graduate of the University of Zambia and a former secondary school teacher who rose through the ranks to the top Civil Service position of Permanent Secretary at the Ministry of Education. As a renowned educationalist and girls’ education activist, she spearheaded the establishment of Zambia’s Girls’ Education Program during her tenure of office. Barbara invited CAMFED to introduce its program to Zambia and served as Patron before taking up the position of Executive Director, and now Executive Advisor. She brings with her a wealth of experience on education reforms and girls’ and women’s issues and has led a multi-sectoral, national approach to child protection. Barbara is a board member of the Global Partnership for Education, which brings together developing country partners, donors, multilateral agencies, and the private sector to achieve the common goal of getting all children into school for a quality education.

Diana Ayala

Diana Ayala

Youth Leader, Global Partnership for Education

Diana Ayala is 27 years old and lives in Honduras. She is part and leader of CEAAL Youth Group in Honduras and part of GCE & CLADE through Foro Dakar Honduras. She is regularly involved with advocacy actions to local governments and CSOs on the success of SDG 4, and the education sector plan of Honduras, which includes access, quality and free education for all.

Fiona Mavhinga

Fiona Mavhinga

Executive Adviser, CAMFED Association

Fiona Mavhinga is one of the first young women to complete her education with CAMFED support in Zimbabwe. She is a lawyer, and heads the strategic development of the CAMFED Association — the powerful pan-African network of women leading action on the big challenges their countries face — from child marriage, and girls’ exclusion from education, to climate change. Mavhinga experienced firsthand the continued vulnerability of young women who manage to complete secondary school in rural Africa, but lack access to resources, skills training, and opportunities, and these experiences contributed to her understanding of the role of the association’s key founder. She is now leading on ways to grow and replicate this powerful model for systemic change.

Komal Kumar

Komal Narayan

Climate Activist and Volunteer, Alliance for Future Generations

Komal is a Climate Activist from Fiji. Given the critical situation that the world is in, especially the Pacific, she believes there is a need to bring about more awareness around what the Pacific is going through and the severity of climate change that they are facing. Ms. Komal is also doing her Master of Arts in Development Studies by Research, focusing on “Climate Change and Planned Relocation in Fiji”. She has joined the Sustainable Ocean Alliance as the Pacific Island Representative. The main objective of her role is to increase the presence of SOA in the Pacific and provide an engaging platform for youths from the Pacific to engage more effectively in the Ocean space both regionally and internationally.

Christina Kwauk

Christina Kwauk

Nonresident Fellow - Global Economy and Development, Center for Universal Education, Brookings

Christina Kwauk is a social scientist and policy analyst with expertise on girls’ education, 21st century skills and youth empowerment, and the intersections of gender, education, and climate change. Christina is co-editor of Curriculum and Learning for Climate Action: Toward an SDG 4.7 Roadmap for Systems Change and co-author of What Works in Girls’ Education: Evidence for the World’s Best Investment. She has published numerous policy papers, including “The new green learning agenda: Approaches to quality education for climate empowerment.” Christina is an education consultant, research director at Unbounded Associates, and non-resident fellow at Brookings. She is a member of the Drawdown Lift Advisory Council, Girl Rising’s Advisory Council, the International Jury for the UNESCO Prize for Girls’ and Women’s Education, and the Judging Academy for the World’s Best School Prizes.

Beth Roberts

Beth Roberts

Director, Center for Women’s Land Rights, Landesa

Beth Roberts directs the Landesa Center for Women’s Land Rights. She is a law, policy, and gender expert who works to strengthen gender-equal and socially inclusive rights to land and productive assets. She provides legal and policy recommendations to government decision-makers, traditional authorities, civil society partners, and international human rights and climate change bodies, conducts consultations and assessments with rural communities, and works to collaborate with, strengthen, and expand the network of practitioners focused on gender and natural resource justice worldwide. During her time at Landesa, she has focused on advocacy at both global and national levels for greater policy coherence and stronger implementation related to gender and land in global agendas (the Sustainable Development Goals, human rights norms and standards, and climate change); and internally on organizational change initiatives and program and project management. She leads and works with a team of gender specialists across Landesa that seeks to ensure an integrated approach to Landesa’s gender equality and social inclusion work. Beth holds three advanced degrees from the University of Washington: a Master of Public Administration (MPA) with a focus on international development and nonprofit management, a Juris Doctor (JD), and an LL.M in Sustainable International Development Law.

What did you think of this series on the future of humanitarian aid?


Your feedback is important to us.

Share on social media using

#HumanitarianFuture

#DevexSeries

Partners

Devex

Devex

Devex is the media platform for the global development community. A social enterprise, we connect and inform over one million development, health, humanitarian, and sustainability professionals through news, business intelligence, and funding & career opportunities so you can do more good for more people.

Conrad N. Hilton Foundation

Conrad N. Hilton Foundation

International hotelier Conrad N. Hilton established the grantmaking foundation that bears his name in 1944 to help people living in poverty and experiencing disadvantage worldwide. Today, the work continues, concentrating on efforts to improve early childhood development outcomes, support older youth as they transition from foster care, ensure opportunity youth can access career pathways, prevent homelessness, identify solutions to safe water access, help integrate refugees into society and lift the work of Catholic sisters. Additionally, following selection by an independent, international jury, the Foundation annually awards the $2.5 million Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize to an organization doing extraordinary work to reduce human suffering. The Foundation is one of the world’s largest, with assets recently growing to approximately $7.5 billion. It has awarded grants to date totaling more than $2 billion, $207 million worldwide in 2020.